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Javier
3-Sep-2009, 09:26 AM
Yes. I don't understand the market direction. I am only 20 years working here.

From Bloomberg:

Oracle Faces In-Depth EU Probe Over Sun Purchase (Update3)

By Peter Chapman and Matthew Newman
Sept. 3 (Bloomberg) -- Oracle Corp. (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=ORCL%3AUS)’s $7.4 billion acquisition of Sun Microsystems Inc. (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=JAVA%3AUS) was put on hold as the European Commission opened an in-depth investigation two weeks after U.S. regulators approved the deal.
There are “serious doubts” about competition in the market for databases if Oracle acquires Sun, the European Commission in Brussels said in an e-mailed statement today. The EU’s initial probe indicated that the deal may lead to higher prices and reduced consumer choice, the regulator said.
“The commission has to examine very carefully the effects on competition in Europe when the world’s leading proprietary database company proposes to take over the world’s leading open source database company,” Competition Commissioner Neelie Kroes (http://search.bloomberg.com/search?q=Neelie+Kroes&site=wnews&client=wnews&proxystylesheet=wnews&output=xml_no_dtd&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&filter=p&getfields=wnnis&sort=date:D:S:d1) said in the statement.
The investigation contrasts with the decision of U.S. regulators to clear the deal on Aug. 20. The EU probe focuses on Oracle’s control of the MySQL product, the leading open-source database that Sun bought last year.
“It increases the risk that Oracle will have to divest some aspects of the Sun business to get the deal done,” said Chris Hickey (http://search.bloomberg.com/search?q=Chris+Hickey&site=wnews&client=wnews&proxystylesheet=wnews&output=xml_no_dtd&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&filter=p&getfields=wnnis&sort=date:D:S:d1), an analyst at Atlantic Equities in London. He owns no Oracle shares and rates them overweight. Divesting MySQL “wouldn’t be a huge impact financially” on the deal, he said.
Earnings
Oracle, based in Redwood City, California, acknowledged the extended probe in a statement today. Oracle, the world’s second- largest software maker, has said the purchase would add $1.5 billion to operating earnings (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=ORCL%3AUS), excluding some items, in the first year.
“Closing of the transaction is subject to certain conditions, including clearance by the European Commission,” Oracle said.
Analysts, including ISI Group’s Heather Bellini (http://search.bloomberg.com/search?q=Heather+Bellini&site=wnews&client=wnews&proxystylesheet=wnews&output=xml_no_dtd&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&filter=p&getfields=wnnis&sort=date:D:S:d1) in New York, had expected the EU to approve the deal during the initial 25-working day investigation. Bellini said in a note today that the EU probe won’t last the entire 90 working days.
“We continue to believe that Oracle will be successful in acquiring Sun in its current form, without the need for a divestiture,” she wrote.
Oracle competitors including SAP AG and Microsoft Corp. (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=MSFT%3AUS) lobbied for an extended probe, arguing the deal could drive up prices for databases.
No Java Issues
In the U.S., the Department of Justice scrutinized the deal’s impact on the licensing of Sun’s Java programming language. The EU has no issues with Java licensing, commission spokesman Jonathan Todd (http://search.bloomberg.com/search?q=Jonathan+Todd&site=wnews&client=wnews&proxystylesheet=wnews&output=xml_no_dtd&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&filter=p&getfields=wnnis&sort=date:D:S:d1) said.
In Europe, the focus is on whether Oracle will have the potential of building a dominant position in the enterprise server market by acquiring MySQL. Oracle is the market leader in proprietary databases, while Sun’s MySQL database product is the leading open-source database, the commission said.
The commission said the database market is “highly concentrated” with Oracle, International Business Machines Corp. and Microsoft controlling about 85 percent of the market.
Oracle fell 21 cents, or 1 percent to $21.55 in Nasdaq Stock Market trading at 9:49 a.m. New York time. Santa Clara, California-based Sun Microsystems (http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/quote?ticker=JAVA%3AUS), fell 19 cents, or 2 percent to $9.13.
EU ‘Understands’
One company that makes database software derived from MySQL, Tuusula, Finland-based Monty Program, said the EU decision indicates the regulator “understands” the issues in the case better than the U.S.
“I’m positively surprised to see the EU had the strength to do this even if the Department of Justice approved the deal,” said Henrik Ingo, chief operating officer of Monty Program AB.
The EU said its initial probe showed that Oracle’s databases and Sun’s MySQL compete directly in many sectors of the database market.
“MySQL is widely expected to represent a greater competitive constraint as it becomes increasingly functional,” the commission said. “The commission’s investigation has also shown that the open source nature of Sun’s MySQL might not eliminate fully the potential for anti-competitive effects.”
The MySQL database, downloaded more than 50,000 times a day according to Sun’s Web site, powers many of the biggest Web sites, including Wikipedia, Facebook and Google Inc.’s YouTube.
Oracle Chief Executive Officer Larry Ellison (http://search.bloomberg.com/search?q=Larry+Ellison&site=wnews&client=wnews&proxystylesheet=wnews&output=xml_no_dtd&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&filter=p&getfields=wnnis&sort=date:D:S:d1) would also gain Sun’s Java programming language and Solaris operating system, which work with its top-selling database program.
Ellison said Java was the main reason behind his decision to buy Sun.